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Project Canada 2005 (Uploaded: 7/24/2020)

The 2005 survey was the seventh in the Project Canada national adult surveys. It was carried out by mail between approximately July 15 and December 15 of 2005. Reginald W. Bibby was the principal investigator, assisted by Project Manager Reggie Gordon Bibby, Jr., Jim Savoy, and a number of student research assistants. The initial Project Canada 2005 sampling frame consisted of a list of 1,729 people who had participated in one or more of the six previous Project Canada adult surveys (1975 through 2000). Previous experiences suggested that as many as 50 percent of these individuals (about 900) would participate once again. To produce an eventual participating sample of at least 1,500 cases, this core was supplemented with an initial new sample of some 1,500 people and a projected 500 participants, resulting in a total 2005 sample of around 1,500 people. In addition, to facilitate comparisons with Alberta in the province's centennial year, Alberta was oversampled to bring its total to around 600 people - permitting generalizations within about +/- four points, 19 times in 20. This involved adding about 400 people beyond the 232 Albertans who had participated in Project Canada 2000 and selecting some 1200 additional people from the province. Our projections were reasonably accurate: the total number of 2005 participants consisted of 2,400 people, including 655 Albertans. With oversampling compressed, the Alberta sample is an appropriate 160 (10 percent), and the total national sample 1,600.

National Survey of Family Growth - (2013-2015) Male Respondent File (Uploaded: 7/24/2020)

The National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) is designed and administered by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), an agency with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (DHHS/CDC). Since the NSFG began in 1973, there have been nine data release files. The purpose of the survey is to produce reliable national estimates of: - Factors affecting pregnancy, including sexual activity, contraceptive use, and infertility; - The medical care associated with contraception, infertility, and childbirth; - Factors affecting marriage, divorce, cohabitation, and adoption; - Adoption and caring for nonbiological children - Father involvement behaviors, and - Men's and women's attitudes about sex, childbearing, and marriage. The survey contains key religion variables that may relate to these topics. The survey results are used by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and other research and policy organizations to plan health services and health education programs, and to do statistical studies on the topics listed above. (NSFG 2013-2015 User's Guide: Main Text) Each wave of the NSFG survey contains a Female Respondent Survey, Male Respondent Survey, and a Pregnancy Survey. This is the Male Respondent Survey.

National Survey of Family Growth - (2013-2015) Pregnancy File (Uploaded: 7/24/2020)

The National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) is designed and administered by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), an agency with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (DHHS/CDC). Since the NSFG began in 1973, there have been nine data release files. The purpose of the survey is to produce reliable national estimates of: - Factors affecting pregnancy, including sexual activity, contraceptive use, and infertility; - The medical care associated with contraception, infertility, and childbirth; - Factors affecting marriage, divorce, cohabitation, and adoption; - Adoption and caring for nonbiological children - Father involvement behaviors, and - Men's and women's attitudes about sex, childbearing, and marriage. The survey contains key religion variables that may relate to these topics. The survey results are used by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and other research and policy organizations to plan health services and health education programs, and to do statistical studies on the topics listed above. (NSFG 2013-2015 User's Guide: Main Text) Each wave of the NSFG survey contains a Female Respondent Survey, Male Respondent Survey, and a Pregnancy Survey. This is the Pregnancy Survey.

National Survey of Family Growth - (2013-2015) Female Respondent File (Uploaded: 7/24/2020)

The National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) is designed and administered by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), an agency with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (DHHS/CDC). Since the NSFG began in 1973, there have been nine data release files. The purpose of the survey is to produce reliable national estimates of: - Factors affecting pregnancy, including sexual activity, contraceptive use, and infertility; - The medical care associated with contraception, infertility, and childbirth; - Factors affecting marriage, divorce, cohabitation, and adoption; - Adoption and caring for nonbiological children - Father involvement behaviors, and - Men's and women's attitudes about sex, childbearing, and marriage. The survey contains key religion variables that may relate to these topics. The survey results are used by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and other research and policy organizations to plan health services and health education programs, and to do statistical studies on the topics listed above. (NSFG 2013-2015 User's Guide: Main Text) Each wave of the NSFG survey contains a Female Respondent Survey, Male Respondent Survey, and a Pregnancy Survey. This is the Female Respondent Survey.

Project Canada 2000 (Uploaded: 7/24/2020)

The Project Canada Research Program has been carried out from The University of Lethbridge under the direction of Dr. Reginald Bibby. National surveys of adults 18 and over have been conducted in 1975, 1980, 1985, 1990, 1995, 2000, and 2005, with complementary surveys of youth in 1984, 1992, 2000, and 2008. Further, in 2015 and 2016, additional adult and youth surveys were completed on-line in partnership with Angus Reid.

The survey was the sixth in the Project Canada national adult surveys. It was carried out by mail between approximately April 15 and October 15 of 2000. Reginald W. Bibby was the principal investigator, assisted by Project Manager Reggie Gordon Bibby, Jr. and a number of student research assistants.

Project Canada 2000 was comprised of a list of some 1,700 people who had participated in the five previous Project Canada adult surveys (1975 through 1995). Based on previous participation experiences, an additional new sample of some 1,500 people were drawn, with the goal of having a total sample of at least 1,500 people.

These 1,729 cases have been weighted for provincial and community size, along with gender and age. In order to minimize the use of large weight factors, the sample again was reduced-to 1,240 cases.

So weighted, the sample is highly representative of the Canadian population. A representative sample of this size should be accurate within about four percentage points on most items, 19 times in 20 similar surveys.

A major interest of the ongoing national surveys has been to monitor social change and stability. Each survey sample from 1980 through 2005 consisted of (a) a core of people who participated in the previous survey and (b) new participants, who were used to create a full national sample of about 1,500 cases. For example, while the first 1975 survey was a typical cross-sectional survey with 1,917 participants, the Project Canada 1980 sample of 1,482 people included 1,056 who had also been involved in 1975.

Various panels can be constructed from the surveys according to the five-year interval desired (e.g.,1975-85, 1980-90, 1990-2000). While no claim is being made that these panels are representative of all Canadians, they do provide intriguing and novel data on the attitudes, outlooks, and behavior of a core of Canadians over the last quarter of the 20th century. The panels can be weighted as deemed necessary by data users.

The Evangelical Voter in the United States, 1983 (Uploaded: 7/24/2020)

Self-identified Christian voters were interviewed in this survey. Interviewers probed for responses on a variety of political issues, as well as for religious opinions and behavior. Political issues included the nuclear freeze, the Equal Rights Amendment, abortion, prayer in schools, U.S. intervention and aid in Central America, and defense spending. Other data include voting behavior in the 1980 Presidential election, projected voting in the 1984 election, and opinions of various public figures and religious groups. The importance of religious views in the selection of political candidates was assessed by each individual, in addition to opinions and experiences concerning the involvement of religious leaders with politics. Information was also gathered on religious behavior such as church attendance and watching religious television programs. Data on sex, race, educational level, occupation, income, and political party registration are included.

Project Teen Canada 1984 (Uploaded: 6/5/2020)

The Project Teen Canada 1984 national survey is the first in a series of national, bilingual research projects examining the values, attitudes, beliefs, behaviour, and expectations of Canadian teenagers. Based on the Project Canada adult surveys, the project has taken representative samples of Canadian teenagers every eight years, creating panel studies through which social change and stability can be monitored.

Project Teen Canada 2008 (Uploaded: 6/5/2020)

The Project Teen Canada 2008 national survey is the fourth in a series of national, bilingual research projects examining the values, attitudes, beliefs, behaviour, and expectations of Canadian teenagers. Based on the Project Canada adult surveys, the project has taken representative samples of Canadian teenagers every eight years, creating panel studies through which social change and stability can be monitored.

Project Teen Canada 2000 (Uploaded: 6/5/2020)

The Project Teen Canada 2000 national survey is the third in a series of national, bilingual research projects examining the values, attitudes, beliefs, behaviour, and expectations of Canadian teenagers. Based on the Project Canada adult surveys, the project has taken representative samples of Canadian teenagers every eight years, creating panel studies through which social change and stability can be monitored.

Project Teen Canada 1992 (Uploaded: 6/5/2020)

The Project Teen Canada 1992 national survey is the second in a series of national, bilingual research projects examining the values, attitudes, beliefs, behaviour, and expectations of Canadian teenagers. Based on the Project Canada adult surveys, the project has taken representative samples of Canadian teenagers every eight years, creating panel studies through which social change and stability can be monitored.

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