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Recent Additions

Chapman Survey of American Fears, Wave 5 (2018) (Uploaded: 11/18/2019)

Collected in 2018, the Chapman Survey of American Fears, Wave 5 (CSAF) is an annual survey. The survey includes core demographic items, and measures of religion and politics. However the survey's primary focus is asking questions designed to determine the extent to which Americans fear or worry about life events, governmental policy, crime and victimization, natural and man-made disasters, different spaces and other phenomena.

Chapman Survey of American Fears, Wave 4 (2017) (Uploaded: 11/18/2019)

Chapman University engaged SSRS to conduct the 2017 wave of The Chapman University Survey on American Fears (CSAF). Chapman University initiated this nationwide poll on what strikes fear in Americans in 2014. The primary objective of this survey is to collect annual data on the fears, worries and concerns of Americans, the personal, behavioral and attitudinal characteristics related to those fears, and how those fears are associated with other attitudes and behaviors.

CSAF was conducted online via the SSRS Probability Panel and invited adults age 18 and older to participate via the web. It included 1,207 participants and data collection was conducted from June 28 to July 7, 2017.

Chapman Survey of American Fears, Wave 3 (2016) (Uploaded: 11/18/2019)

Collected in 2016, the Chapman Survey of American Fears, Wave 3 (CSAF) is an annual survey. The survey includes core demographic items, and measures of religion and politics. However the survey's primary focus is asking questions designed to determine the extent to which Americans fear or worry about life events, governmental policy, crime and victimization, natural and man-made disasters, different spaces and other phenomena. Waves 1, 2, and 3 also include items related to beliefs about crime (has crime increased over the last 20 years, possible explanations for criminal behavior), media consumption and scientific attitudes.

Chapman Survey of American Fears, Wave 2 (2015) (Uploaded: 11/18/2019)

Collected in 2015, the Chapman Survey of American Fears, Wave 2 (CSAF) is the second wave of a planned annual survey. The survey includes core demographic items, and measures of religion and politics. However the survey's primary focus is asking questions designed to determine the extent to which Americans fear or worry about life events, governmental policy, crime and victimization, natural and man-made disasters, different spaces and other phenomena. Items related to beliefs about crime (has crime increased over the last 20 years, possible explanations for criminal behavior), media consumption and scientific attitudes are included in Waves 1 and 2.

American National Election Studies, Time Series Study, 2016 (Uploaded: 12/3/2018)

"The ANES 2016 Time Series is a continuation of the series of election studies conducted by the ANES since 1948 to support analysis of public opinion and voting behavior in U.S. presidential elections. This year’s study features a dual-mode design with both traditional face-to-face interviewing (n=1,181) and surveys conducted on the Internet (n=3,090), and a total sample size of 4,271.

"Study Content Highlights:
Data collection for the ANES 2016 Time Series Study began in early September and continued into January 2017. Pre election interviews were conducted with study respondents during the two months prior to the 2016 elections and were followed by post-election re-interviewing beginning November 9, 2016.

"As in 2012, face-to-face interviewing was complemented with data collection on the Internet. Data collection was conducted in the two modes independently, using separate samples but substantially identical questionnaires. Web-administered cases constituted a representative sample separate from the face-to-face.

(ANES. 2017. User’s Guide and Codebook for the ANES 2016 Time Series Study. Ann Arbor, MI and Palo Alto, CA: the University of Michigan and Stanford University.)

American National Election Studies, Time Series Study, 2012 (Uploaded: 12/3/2018)

The ANES 2012 Time Series Study is the 29th study in a series of election studies conducted during years of Presidential elections since 1948 (the "ANES Time Series"). As with all Time Series studies conducted during years of presidential elections, respondents were interviewed during the two months preceding the November election (Pre-election interview), and then re-interviewed during the two months following the election (Post-election interview).

For the first time in Time Series history, face-to-face interviewing was supplemented with data collection on the Internet. Data collection was conducted in the two modes independently, using separate samples. For the face-to-face mode, all sampled persons were interviewed in person using Computer-Assisted Personal Interviewing (CAPI), which also incorporated an interview segment in each wave that was self-administered (CASI). For the Internet mode, all study participants were members of the KnowledgePanel, a panel of regular survey participants administered by GfK (formerly Knowledge Networks).

(ANES. 2014. User’s Guide and Codebook for the ANES 2012 Time Series Study. Ann Arbor, MI and Palo Alto, CA: the University of Michigan and Stanford University.)

The Religion and State Project, Main Dataset and Societal Module, Round 3 (Uploaded: 9/17/2018)

The Religion and State (RAS) project is a university-based project located at Bar Ilan University in Ramat Gan, Israel. The general goal is to provide detailed codings on several aspects of separation of religion and state for 183 states on a yearly basis between 1990 and 2014. This constitutes all countries with populations of 250,000 or more, as well as a sampling of countries with lower populations.

This version also includes the RAS3 Societal Module. Unlike the main RAS dataset, the Societal Module focuses on actions taken by societal actors. It primarily measures societal discrimination and attitudes toward minority religions. This version uses the country as the unit of analysis and covers 1990 to 2014.

The Religion and State Project, Round 3 (Uploaded: 5/14/2018)

The Religion and State (RAS) project is a university-based project located at Bar Ilan University in Ramat Gan, Israel. The general goal is to provide detailed codings on several aspects of separation of religion and state for 183 states on a yearly basis between 1990 and 2014. This constitutes all countries with populations of 250,000 or more, as well as a sampling of countries with lower populations.

Longitudinal Religious Congregations and Membership File, 1980-2010 (County Level) (Uploaded: 5/9/2018)

This dataset is a longitudinal version of the Churches and Church Membership in the United States studies from 1980 and 1990, and the Religious Congregations and Membership Studies from 2000 and 2010. It contains the adherent and congregation counts of 302 religious groups that participated in at least one of the 1980-2010 data collections. It is very important to understand how this file differs from its standalone counterparts, and its many limitations. Using these data for over-time comparisons without reading any documentation will likely result in inaccurate statistics. Data users are strongly urged to read the paper by Rachel Bacon, Roger Finke and Dale Jones that details all the changes made when creating the longitudinal file. Major changes made to the file include new variable naming schemes, new combined religious groups that correct for schisms and mergers, new adherent counts for the United Methodist Church, count estimates for missing data among 40 groups and aggregated county units. Users can download the paper here. Users can download the appendices here: Appendix A, Appendix B, Appendix C.

Longitudinal Religious Congregations and Membership File, 1980-2010 (State Level) (Uploaded: 5/9/2018)

This dataset is a longitudinal version of the Churches and Church Membership in the United States studies from 1980 and 1990, and the Religious Congregations and Membership Studies from 2000 and 2010. It contains the adherent and congregation counts of 302 religious groups that participated in at least one of the 1980-2010 data collections. It is very important to understand how this file differs from its standalone counterparts, and its many limitations. Using these data for over-time comparisons without reading any documentation will likely result in inaccurate statistics. Data users are strongly urged to read the paper by Rachel Bacon, Roger Finke and Dale Jones that details all the changes made when creating the longitudinal file. Major changes made to the file include new variable naming schemes, new combined religious groups that correct for schisms and mergers, new adherent counts for the United Methodist Church, and count estimates for missing data among 40 groups. Users can download the paper here. Users can download the appendices here: Appendix A, Appendix B, Appendix C.

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